New England Soccer Today

Cristman Retires

Adam Cristman scored ten goals in two seasons with the Revs. (Photo: Art Donahue/artdonahue.com)

Former New England Revolution striker Adam Cristman announced his retirement from professional soccer on Tuesday due to concussion-related issues after just six years in professional soccer.

Cristman, 27, currently with the Los Angeles Galaxy, missed the first two months of the season due to a concussion suffered in a preseason game against the New York Red Bulls and then suffered a second concussion in early May less than a week after making his season debut. That concussion would land Cristman on the disabled list on May 25th. Cristman would’ve been eligible to return from the disabled list on July 8th.

“There comes a time in every athlete’s life when they must make that tough decision to end their career,” Cristman said in a statement. “After a little over five years of professional soccer, that time for me is now. The concussions I have suffered this year have forced me to retire. Although I would have preferred to retire on my own terms, the support and counsel from my family, friends, and team have helped make the transition as easy as possible.”

Cristman was drafted by the New England Revolution out of the University of Virginia in the fourth round (48th overall) of the 2007 MLS SuperDraft. As a rookie, he vastly exceeded expectations by playing in 28 games, including 14 starts, and tallying four goals along with four assists. His play made him one of three finalists for the MLS Rookie of the Year award. Cristman also made appearances in the quarterfinals, semifinals and final as the Revs claimed the U.S. Open Cup Championship that year.

“I know I will be able to look back on my career with great pride and think of the many great people I had the chance to share it with,” Cristman’s statement continued. “The championships I have been a part of and the hard years spent near the bottom of the table, each of those years were packed with such great experiences and fond memories. Without a doubt, I will miss the game and everything about professional sports that makes it such a unique experience. Yet, looking forward, I am excited about the future and the next phase in my life.”

In his second year with New England, Cristman was a regular starter, scoring 6 goals and an assist in 18 games (16 starts) and was named player of the week after scoring two goals in a July 4th 2-1 victory over the Los Angeles Galaxy. Cristman’s season was cut short, however, due to injury, and he underwent a season-ending hallux rigidus correction on September 4th.

Prior to the 2009 season, the Revs traded Cristman to the Kansas City Wizards (now Sporting Kansas City), but he played in only five games before suffering a fractured metatarsal that required surgery. He was then sent to D.C. United in an offseason trade before the 2010 season.

With D.C., Cristman would play 17 games (8 starts) and score two goals and an assist, but injury struck again, keeping him out for the final two months of the season.

Cristman was then sent to his fourth club in as many years after a trade to the Galaxy. The 6-foot striker would play 11 games (5 starts) in 2011 with 2 goals and an assist and added another assist in three playoff games (including starting the final) as the Galaxy claimed the MLS Cup. He also scored in the CONCACAF Champions League and a friendly against Spanish giants Real Madrid that season.

After signing a new contract this year, concussions had limited Cristman to just two games before he announced his retirement on Tuesday.

FULL STATEMENT FROM ADAM CRISTMAN

There comes a time in every athlete’s life when they must make that tough decision to end their career. After a little over five years of professional soccer, that time for me is now. The concussions I have suffered this year have forced me to retire. Although I would have preferred to retire on my own terms, the support and counsel from my family, friends, and team have helped make the transition as easy as possible.

I know I will be able to look back on my career with great pride and think of the many great people I had the chance to share it with. The championships I have been a part of and the hard years spent near the bottom of the table, each of those years were packed with such great experiences and fond memories. Without a doubt, I will miss the game and everything about professional sports that makes it such a unique experience. Yet, looking forward, I am excited about the future and the next phase in my life.

I am so blessed and thankful for all the encouragement and support I received along the way from my family, friends, teammates, coaches, trainers, doctors, clubs and fans. It has been an amazing God-given opportunity and I know it would not have been possible without each and every one of them.

So thank you to everyone that I ever had the pleasure of encountering during this journey. It was an adventure I will never forget.

3 Comments

  1. Jim

    July 4, 2012 at 9:27 am

    That’s too bad for Cristman. He looked very promising in his first few games with the Revs… Then he fizzled out. He looked especially awful in the cup final last year. Tough way to end your career, concussions seem to be becoming more and more of a problem. Wish him the best though!

    • Sean Donahue

      July 4, 2012 at 12:04 pm

      Other injuries really held his career back before the concussions forced him to retire. It seems like he’s had season ending surgery/injuries nearly every year of his pro career – sad to see after such a solid rookie season. Glad he was able to win a MLS Cup and U.S. Open Cup in his short career — he definitely seemed like a nice guy from the few times I spoke with him when he was with the Revs.

  2. rick sewall

    July 4, 2012 at 4:04 pm

    I would not complain as a coach if all youth and high school level teams were required to wear a sensible padded helmet. Another possibility I am not too eager about is to allow heading only in the penalty areas. Anyway, head to head contact is happening too often..

Leave a Reply to Sean Donahue Cancel reply